Politics

Trump marketing campaign raises hefty $210 million in August, however it’s effectively in need of Biden’s document haul

US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he makes his way to board Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on September 1, 2020.

Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign and its joint Republican committees raised $210 million in August, a monthly record for Trump but far short of the $364 million raised by Trump’s opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, during the same period.

“The Trump campaign will have all the resources we need to spread the message of President Trump’s incredible record of achievement, on the ground and on the air,” said Trump’s campaign manager Bill Stepien in a statement on the August numbers.

Stepien’s assurance Wednesday came as both Trump campaign strategists and top GOP donors are confronting the harsh reality of the campaign’s financial situation relative to Trump’s standing in the polls.

So far this year, the Trump campaign has spent more than $800 million, including millions of dollars of strategically questionable expenses, according to a recent New York Times probe of the campaign’s spending.

Yet Biden is currently leading Trump in nearly all swing-state polls, and nationally Biden has an average advantage of seven percentage points, according to Real Clear Politics. 

Trump and his joint committees with the Republican Party have outraised Biden every month save for June and August since the former vice president became the nominee. 

Biden’s recent success came the same month he selected Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate and accepted his party’s nomination at the Democratic National Convention. 

The hauls by the two candidates mark the latest moment in a larger fundraising battle between Democrats and Republicans in the 2020 election cycle. 

Democrats running for U.S. Senate seats have a slight edge over Republicans so far. According to data from the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, Democratic Senate candidates have seen 54% of contributions go their way. Democrats are looking to take over the majority in the Senate. 

Democrats running for seats in the U.S. House of Representatives have also been able to raise more than their Republican opponents. Democrats hold the majority in the House. 

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